On the importance of a ‘Sanity Project’

It’s too easy to get lost in the pressures of the ‘rat-race’ – there are bills to be paid, children to be educated, older generations to be looked after in their autumn years and many more. To maintain their sanity everybody has their own strategies. There is the book readers (I used to be one of them), the party animal, the couch potato, …

For me there tends to me (at least) one ‘Sanity Project’ that allows me to take a break from current pressures and realities and take a (short) break. This very website is one of those projects allowing some time to read up on and share things of interest. I often get comments like ‘how can you relax by doing more ?’, but I guess this must have to do with my personality type. Not all (in fact too many) of my sanity project actually involve physical activity they generally have a few things in common:

  • inexpensive
  • in line with (at least one) passion
  • quickly done
  • very enjoyable

Looking at the success of the revival of the various “hacker” or “maker” spaces there seems to be some revival of this. There are plenty of resources out there on these topic. Some great starting points are in the following list.

One Australian organisation I joined recently the Institute of Backyard Studiess is trying to revive the old tradition of ‘inventing’ things in sheds.

A recent addition to the SlowTech Google+ Community has also been an interesting read on a similar line. http://www.andrewwillner.com/2013/07/preserving-the-past-to-serve-the-future/

What is your favorite ‘Sanity Project’ ?
Do you have too many ‘Sanity Projects’ ?

Love to get some comments on this one. Feel free to chip in !

Eyes wired shut: the perils of twitter brain

This has been concerning me for a while now. As a avid book reader throughout all my youth I seem to have lost the ability to sit down with a book of fiction and read slowly and thoroughly for longer periods of time.

Because I am not a neurologist I am not sure if this is actually a ‘re-wiring’ of the brain as commonly suggested. Probably more a ‘habit’ that has been developed by years of needing to cut corners to get quick results. Nevertheless it’s not a positive thing as far as I am concerned and something to be aware of.

I personally would also not blame this (solely) on digital tools like Twitter either. The general fast pace of life and the constant pressures to speed up are probably contributing much more overall than a single tool. Although these tools do have a potential to become time and attention ‘sinks’ if you are not careful and get drawn into too much. Due to the fact that these tools can be extremely useful (if you know how to use them), there is always a potential. Depending on your personality type this constant source of interesting information can become quite ‘addictive’.

Original article in Australian Financial Review (blocked by Paywall :( ) http://www.afr.com/p/national/arts_saleroom/eyes_wired_shut_the_perils_of_twitter_nXoFVp9QMfUDjgwQMjymqK

Notes from Dreamworlds

This series of videos recently came up in my social media streams and they have really impressed me and helped calm down things at a stressful moment. Nothing better than looking at nature to calm things down. And (sometimes) if you can’t get out there yourselves, watching a video is the next best thing.

These videos deal with the microscopic biosphere normally hidden to the naked eye.
The most important living organisms that play the key functions in the biosphere might not seem exciting when it comes to motion. Plants, fungi, sponges, corals, plankton, and microorganisms make life on Earth possible and do all the hard biochemical job. Our brains are wired to comprehend and follow fast and dynamic events better, especially those very few that happen at speeds comparable to ours. In a world of blazingly fast predators and escaping prey events where it takes minutes, hours, or days to notice any changes are harder to grasp.

Slow Life

Slow Life from Daniel Stoupin on Vimeo.

The hidden life in pond water

The hidden life in pond water from Daniel Stoupin on Vimeo.

Original source: http://notes-from-dreamworlds.blogspot.com.au/2014/03/slow-life.html – excellent work !

Wise words from a Korean hermit

HWANG Daekwon

Came across this article in SlowJapan which is definitely worth the read:

… It was a true savior for Mr. HWANG Daekwon when he figured out how to spend his slowly running time in jail for 13 years, which is to observe plants, herbs and weeds around. It also helped him to restore and maintain his mental and physical health respectively from the deep-rooted anger and injury incurred by severe torture. …

http://slowjapan.wordpress.com/2012/01/23/a-hermit-from-korea-talks-about-life-and-death/

Resources

Amazon Books by Hwang Daekwon

Buy Yourself a Swing

Worthwile reading for some reflections. No real commentary needed…

“Buy yourself a swing, Rob.

Guaranteed to ‘lift the spirits’ when able to get out.
Was going to suggest a trip to the play area in Thirsk, but probably very non P.C. – Single man on a swing?!?!?!
Love and healing hugs

To you and Lindsey

Dottie and Paul xxx”

Read the original post here: http://robcollins.me.uk/2013/09/27/buy-yourself-a-swing/

How to Fix Your Soul

This is an older piece of a great economist thinker (Umair Haque) I came around recently. It’s a year old, but as relevant as ever. If you haven’t read it – do yourself a favor and head to the link below and read the article.

And if you’re a user of Twitter – follow @umairh. Often good for a provocative statement or two. But always good to make you stop and think.

So much human potential squandered for such a significant chunk of time in a life; so much time spent grinding one’s wheels can, it’s true, exhaust one’s fuel for living; can come to leave one feeling stuck in the existential desert. So what happens now? More of the same — a perma-crisis whose human toll on you and I seems to be a kind of crisis-malaise, a habituation to human heartache, the dulling of the once-razor-sharp edge of what could have been? Is that it — all there is, for us, this “lost” generation?

Original blog: Umair Haque – Harvard Business Review

Micro Adventures

Adventure is all around us, at all times. Even during hard financial times such as these. Times when getting out into the wild is more enjoyable, invigorating and important than ever.

This could have been a very clever marketing campaign by manufacturers of camping gear, but I really like it. And even if it would be – let’s face it – there is much more direct health benefits than for example the Valentines Day scam perpetuated by flower shops & chocolate manufacturers (not to be confused with the giving of genuine gifts at random times).

micro adventure

Instead it is an idea by Alastair Humphreys – http://www.microadventures.org who is trying to challenge the assumption that adventures are expensive, require long-term planning and need extreme levels of fitness. He has coined the term ‘micro-adventures‘ for short, local discovery tours.

Local

“You do not need to fly to the other side of the planet to find wilderness and beauty.”
Alastair Humphreys

A microadventure is an adventure that is close to home. It’s about discovering new places in your neighborhood, open-minded venturing with the purpose of finding new experiences. Some ideas on how to find locations can be found here http://www.alastairhumphreys.com/how-to-find-a-location-for-a-microadventure/

It’s about you

“Adventure is stretching yourself; mentally, physically or culturally. It is about doing something you do not normally do, pushing yourself hard and doing it to the best of your ability.”
Alastair Humphreys

You do not need to be an trained elite athlete or lots of spare cash to have an adventure. A microadventure is an adventure that is cheap, simple, short (CSS). It has the spirit of a big adventure condensed into a midweek escape from the office, or even a weekend away. Most people even those living in big cities are not far away from (at least) smaller of wilderness areas.


Great idea Alastair Humphreys – and thanks for sharing !!!

Stress Response: Savior to Killer

Stress Response – what was a life-saver initially, making us run from predators and enabling us to take down prey. Today we can’t seem to turn off the same life-saving physical reaction to cope with intense, ongoing stress.

Robert Sapolsky, Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University, reveals just how dangerous prolonged exposure to stress can be.